These new cross-linked polymers can function as hydrogels and emulsifiers in personal-care products. They are naturally derived from inexpensive and renewable biomass sugars, and exhibit antimicrobial properties, which are rare in polymers. Because they can act both as emulsifiers and have antimicrobial properties, they may take the place of or reduce the need for multiple ingredients in personal care and cosmetic products where preservatives are needed. Skin testing has already been undertaken by Consumer Product Testing Labs. The technology spins out of a larger effort at DuPont to discover and refine renewable biomass-sourced materials. These polymers are produced from aldaric, glucaric, and similar acids and derivatives.

Benefits Summary

  • Excellent hand feel.
  • No appreciable skin irritation during testing.
  • Antimicrobial properties.
  • Naturally and renewably derived.
  • May replace or reduce the need for separate emulsifier and preservative. more

Development Summary

Currently, this is a laboratory-scale technology, but DuPont knows of no reason why it would not scale to industrial proportions. The source material is biomass, and so is both natural and renewable.

IP Summary

This technology is supported by 6 US patents. more