This company is looking for new materials and solutions (including multilayer film with sheet glass or organic-inorganic glass composite materials) that can substitute for existing sheet glass in applications such as construction.



Background:

It is common to use sheet glass for construction applications such as windows, curtain walls, atria, and floors. However, sheet glass has many disadvantages.

For example, sheet glass suffers from high thermal conductivity, which makes it an inefficient insulator.

Also, sheet glass is heavy compared to other materials like plastics, and requires additional bracing and support for its weight.

There exist resin-based alternatives such as Eastman Tritan(TM), but no glass or glass-like material fully satisfies the basic requirements for thermal conductivity, transparency, and durability.

We believe that the basic requirements for a sheet-glass substitute include:

  • Similar properties to glass in terms of transparency, high mechanical strength, weatherability, and durability
  • The new material needs to be about half the weight of glass
  • Thermal conductivity should be lower than that of glass; that is, thermal conductivity should be lower than 0.2W/m k
  • No tint or color change should occur because of UV exposure

 
Note:   

  • Preventive technologies such as hard-coating or anti-UV coating are acceptable
  • Joint RandD is acceptable
  • Materials under development are acceptable

 
Constraints:

In order to replace glass, transparency and transmittance are critical.

Possible solution areas:

  • PC (polycarbonate) with some improvements (durability, transparency, etc.)
  • Organic-inorganic hybrid materials
  • Aerogels

 
Desired Outcome:

A sample should be available.

Previously Attempted Solutions:

The company has previously reviewed some aerogels.

It also has considered the possibility of polycarbonate with respect to this technology need, but the only technology available for practical use at this time is hard-coat.

However, for durability in various aspects, hard-coat does not appear to have the same level of quality assurance (at least a 10-year warranty) as that of glass.

Further, change of permeability and image clarity caused by aging is also a concern.

Desired Timeframe: Within 12 months

Annual Revenue: More Than $500 Million

Company Type: Commercial (Publicly Held)

Field of Use and Intended Application: Construction, transportation, etc.             

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