Overview:
This organization is seeking a heat-tolerant, food-contact-safe treatment or coating that will improve the scratch-resistance of glass, including ceramic, soda lime and/or borosilicate glass, and glass that is decorated with ceramic paint, when subjected to challenge by abrasive debris. In addition to aesthetics, the coated or treated glass must be able to withstand the rigors of use, including thermal shock, exposure to chemicals, and exposure to temperature fluctuations.

Background:
Glass surfaces may become scratched by debris or abrasive force, leading to an unaesthetic appearance and shorter product lifetime. Although tempering or ceramizing improve glass surface strength, this organization is seeking an additional means to build scratch-resistance or to heal scratch marks, as well as to improve other aesthetic parameters such as fingerprint resistance. In order to be viable, all solutions should be capable of being applied in an industrial process and should not degrade important glass performance parameters, such as compatibility with heat shock, transparency, resistance to chemicals, and compatibility with tempering or ceramizing.

Constraints:
Solutions will:

    • Improve scratch resistance substantially compared to conventional tempered glass or ceramic glass.
    • Be compatible with the following types of glass: ceramic glass, borosilicate glass, and/or soda lime glass (clear, coated, and/or decorated).
    • Be applied to glass after the glass is formed, not during the forming process.
    • Not degrade other properties of glass including, but not limited to:
      • Transparency — degradation of 5-10% is acceptable
      • Heat resistance (up to 650°C or 900°C)
      • Resistance to chemicals such as acids, alkalis, and surfactants.
      • Thermal shock resistance
      • Preferably resistance to fingerprints
    • Preferably, use ingredients that are food-safe and food-compliant or generally recognized as safe for food contact.
    • Have a practical method for application in a manufacturing environment.
    • Be cost effective at commercial scale.

Possible Solution Areas:
Possible solutions may include novel glass hardening methods, heat treatments, coatings, or chemical treatments. Self-healing treatments that can repair marks are also of interest.

Field of Use & Intended Application:
Industrial glass coatings/treatments

Desired Outcome:
Looking for technologies that may be applied prior to ceramizing or tempering or post applied to ceramized or tempered glass while retaining high heat capability of the glass.