The organization would like to find a way to retain and store heat from the engine and coolant for a period of up to 16 hours, in order to use that heat to warm up the engine coolant during a cold start.

This may be a thermal storage material; but the organization is open to other methods.

Background:

Heating the engine coolant preparatory to startup can reduce friction during the beginning of a drive cycle.

This can result in a CO2reduction of 2-4% (depending on the cycle and engine/vehicle combination).

The method may be a type of thermally absorptive material that can charge itself with heat from the engine and coolant during vehicle operation, act as a heat reservoir to for up to 16 hours, and then transfer that heat to the coolant prior to start.

However, the proposed method can be anything that will achieve a similar result.

The ability to absorb heat from the engine may also help enhance the efficiency of the vehicle’s overall cooling system, and help stabilize the engine at its best operating temperature.

Constraints:

  • Specific heat capacity > 500J/g
  • Charge temperature 85°C
  • Discharge temperature (at 15°C inlet) 20 to 60°C
  • Device data:
    • Gross heat capacity 1250Wh
    • Discharge power: 22.5kW
    • Max storage material weight ~10Kg
    • Insulation (if needed)
    • Max energy loss during 16 hours: 250Wh

 Possible solution areas:

  • Materials research
  • Spacecraft cooling
  • Materials and techniques used in passive solar heating and cooling

Desired Outcome:

Efficient methods to extract and retain engine/coolant heat for a period of time in order to warm coolant prior to a cold start.

Desired Timeframe: Within 12 months

Annual Revenue: More Than $500 Million

Company Type: Commercial (Publicly Held)

Field of Use and Intended Application: Vehicle industry

Licensing Terms:

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